Workshop
Draw (and Play) a Synthesizer
Coralie Gourguechon (FR)
More information

Draw (and Play) a Synthesizer
Coralie Gourguechon (FR)

10.05.18 — 15:30

Bâtiment H

Speakers:Coralie Gourguechon

-> To join this or other workshops, first purchase a Mapping LAB ticket here and then register (for either a full-day or two half-day workshops) here.

Using conductive paint and paper electronics, designer Coralie Gourguechon will demonstrate how to create a variety of (lofi) musical interfaces by simply drawing them. This session includes introductions to electronic prototyping, 555 timers, and sound generation.

Create a playable (!) synthesizer with conductive paint on paper. After a hands-on introduction to paper electronics and printed circuits, workshop participants will first learn how to prototype and test an electronic circuit – the 555 timer circuit that generates the synthesizer’s base audio frequency – on a breadboard. By connecting it to a variety of interface templates, we will then explore how visual parameters (line length, thickness, and position) and hand gestures correspond with different (lofi) sounds. Expanding on these templates, participants will draft their own (in a vector drawing program). Once your custom interface is layed out, stenciled, and traced with conductive paint, you’re ready to jam!

Workshop duration: half-day
Workshop language: English/ French (depending on the participants preference)
Number of participants: 12 max.
Requirements: a computer with a vector drawing tool installed (Adobe Illustrator or similar).

About Coralie Gourguechon: Coralie Gourguechon is an interdisciplinary designer and researcher based in Marsailles. Known for her elegant paper electronics kits (DIY speakers and cameras), makeshift foxhole radios, and household hacking exercises, the former Fabrica and Lighthouse resident designer has been widely featured on Wired, Gizmodo, Icon, and Designboom. Coralie is also a 2016 digital innovation IK Prize winner for an artificial intelligence installation shown at the Tate.